Districts F – L

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FIXBY was the smallest township in the Halifax parish with a population of only 400 in 1851. It is situated in the south east of Calderdale but is now part of Huddersfield (Kirklees). Depending on the period involved research in this area can be a problem requiring visits to both the Halifax and Huddersfield record offices.
GREETLAND a village in the township of Elland-cum-Greetland and bordered to the south by the township of Stainland. Greetland lay within the Honour of Pontefract and the lord of the Manor was Ilbert de Lacy who lived at Pontefract Castle. Two ancient homesteads; Clay House and Sunny Bank were located within its boundaries.
HALIFAX is the largest town and was the principal township within the ancient parish. It was the earliest centre of local government and commerce and here the church of St. John the Baptist was founded between 1086 and 1095. It was created a Municipal Borough in 1848 absorbing some portions of the townships of Northowram and Southowram in the process.
HARTSHEAD a village and a small parish adjoining the parish of Halifax to the east. The church of St. Peter whose records commence in 1612 is located here. The registers of this church include many entries pertaining to people who lived within the Halifax parish boundaries and may need to be consulted when carrying out research.
HEBDEN BRIDGE like Sowerby Bridge was a creation of the Industrial Revolution and by 1900 had become the centre of the world’s fustian industry. Although not officially named until 1866 the name of Hebden Bridge had existed from earliest times and took its name from the bridge over Hebden water which is known to have existed in 1600. Hebden Bridge was formed from parts of the former townships of Stansfield, Heptonstall, Wadsworth and Erringden.
HEPTONSTALL is an ancient village and the name of one of the old townships of the parish. A “parochial chapelry” was founded C. 1250 to serve the townships of the upper Calder valley. It lies at the junction of the two ancient pack horse routes into Lancashire (Burnley and Colne) and was a somewhat disputed area during the English Civil War. In earlier days it was a area of some importance boasting a grammar school and cloth hall.
HIPPERHOLME-CUM-BRIGHOUSE was one of the eastern townships of the parish and bounded on the west by Red beck. Two of the parishes’ ancient churches lie within its boundaries, Lightcliffe and Coley. Coley church lies well to the north of the township and served the rural area of Northowram township. The church will be forever be associated with the Rev. Oliver Heywood who was deprived of his living at the time of the Restoration.
HOLMFIELD is an area in the township of Ovenden north of Halifax. It boasted a railway station prior to the demise of the Halifax to Bradford line via Queensbury and it was the start of a branch line for goods traffic that spanned the Wheatley valley on its way to Pellon goods depot. The ancient hamlet of Holdsworth was nearby and Holdsworth House is now used as an hotel.
ILLINGWORTH a village and an area in the township of Ovenden. The church of St. Mary the Virgin is located here and is one of the early chapels to be built in the parish. A large part of the Illingworth area is now occupied by housing.
KING CROSS now part of Halifax was originally in the township of Skircoat. It is here that the road into Lancashire divides, one road going to Burnley via Hebden Bridge the other going to Littleborough via Sowerby Bridge. During the time of the English Civil War when Halifax was held by the Royalists King Cross was one of the outposts keeping watch on the road towards Heptonstall, which was held by Parliament. The intervening terrain was the site of a few local skirmishes.
LANGFIELD was the most easterly township south of the river Calder in the ancient parish of Halifax. Like many of the north facing townships it was sparsely populated. Mankinholes is a present day village and was settled by Norsemen in the 10th. century. One of the areas most noted landmarks, Stoodley Pike is situated within its boundaries.
LIGHTCLIFFE is an area in the towmship of Hipperholme-cum- Brighouse lying to the east of Hipperholme crossroads on the road to Baliff Bridge. Titus Salt the great industrialist lived at Crow nest. Mrs. Holmes of Smith House was often visited by John Wesley and the Moravians established a settlement in Lightcliffe before moving to Fulneck.
LUDDENDEN is a village partly in the townships of Midgley and Warley. A church dedicated to St. Mary the Virgin was first built here C. 1500. The present church, which dates from 1816, occupies probably the most picturesque setting of any church in Calderdale. The Lord Nelson Inn, which has associations with Branwell Bronte, is also located here.

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